Multiple Sclerosis Symptom Guidelines

People who develop Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are usually between 20 and 40 and display at least two symptoms before being seen by the doctor.
Blurred or double vision
Weakness in one or more limbs
Cognitive difficulties
Sudden onset of paralysis
Slurred speech
Lack of coordination
 Early symptoms of MS include:
Tingling
Loss of balance
Numbness
Later, as the disease progresses, other symptoms may appear such as fatigue, muscle spasms, sensitivity to heat, sexual disturbances and changes in thinking or perception.
Fatigue is typically present in the afternoon and may include increased muscle weakness,  mental fatigue, or sleepiness.  Many patients with MS complain of  fatigue even after a good night’s sleep.
Heat sensitivity which can worsen symptoms  occurs in most people with MS.
Spasticity. Muscle spasms are a common  symptom of MS. Spasticity  affects the muscles of the legs and arms, and may interfere with being able to move those muscles freely.
Dizziness. A feeling of “off balance” or lightheadedness or that the surroundings are spinning is common; this is called vertigo. These symptoms are due to damage in the complex nerve pathways that coordinate vision and  are needed to maintain balance.
Impaired thinking  occurs in about half of the people with MS. This can manifest itself by slowed thinking, decreased concentration, or decreased memory.  10% of people with the disease have it so severe  that they cannot carry out  tasks of daily living.
Vision problems can include blurring or graying of vision or blindness in one eye.
Abnormal sensations. Many  MS patients experience  sensations such as numbness, “pins and needles,”  burning, itching,  stabbing, or tearing pains. Even though these symptoms are aggravating, they are not life-threatening and can be  treated.
Speech and swallowing problems in people with MS are caused by damaged nerves that normally would aid in performing these tasks.
Tremors are fairly common in people with MS and can be debilitating and difficult to treat.
Difficulty walking is among the most common symptoms of MS.  This  is related to muscle weakness and/or spasticity.   Balance problems or numbness in the  feet can also make walking difficult.
There are other rare symptoms which include breathing problems and seizures.
 The symptoms can be divided into three categories: primary, secondary, and tertiary.
Primary symptoms are a result of the  impairment of the transmission of electrical signals to muscles  and the organs of the body.  These symptoms include: tremors, weakness,  tingling, paralysis, loss of balance, numbness, vision impairment and bladder or bowel problems. These can be kept under control through the use of medication and rehabilitation.
Secondary symptoms are a result of primary symptoms. For example, paralysis  can lead to bedsores  and bladder or urinary incontinence  can cause frequent urinary tract infections. Although these symptoms can be treated,  the ideal goal is to  treat the primary symptoms.
Tertiary symptoms include psychological, social,  and vocational complications that are associated with the primary and secondary symptoms. Depression can be a common problem for those  with MS.
Deterioration of the protective sheath (known as Demyelination) that surrounds nerve fibers, can occur anywhere in the brain or spinal cord.  Demyelination in the nerves that communicate with the muscles causes problems with movement (called motor symptoms) and demyelination along the nerves that carry  messages to the brain causes disturbances in sensation.
Multiple sclerosis is a varied and unpredictable disease. For many people, it starts with a single symptom, followed by months or longer without any progression of symptoms. In others, the symptoms can become worse within weeks or months.
There are many symptoms, as stated above, but it is important to know that a given individual may only experience some of the symptoms and not others. With some the symptom may occur and then disappear. It is not wise to compare one MS patient with another.
When the symptoms reach a level where physical rehabilitation can be helpful the most effective solutions should be incorporated into the patient rehabilitation treatment program. Such solutions would include the TUTORs. The HANDTUTOR, ARMTUTOR, LEGTUTOR and 3DTUTOR are ergonomic wearable devices together with powerful dedicated rehabilitation software. The system is indicated for patients in rehabilitation centers,, private clinics and the home supported by telerehabilitation. The TUTORs have been used to create an intensive exercise program for patients who have had MS or stroke, Parkinson’s disease, head or brain injuries, CP and other upper and lower limb disabilities.
Currently in use in leading U..S. and European rehab facilities the TUTORs are fully certified by the FDA and CE.
See WWW.MEDITOUCH.CO.IL for further information.
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One response to this post.

  1. i had bleeding in the frontal left,is this common with ms

    Reply

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